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Coffee Roasting Chemistry: Chlorogenic Acids

by Emma Sage, Coffee Science Manager, Specialty Coffee Association of America Chlorogenic Acids: Chemistry & Reality Coffee roasters and coffee-minded chemistry aficionados, myself included, often speak of chlorogenic acids (also known as caffeoylquinic acids or “CQAs”) in coffee. There may be hundreds of scientific studies published on these important constituents of coffee. However, what do we …

Atmospherics: Delivering More than a Cup

By Emma Sage Scientifically speaking, drinking a cup of coffee is what is called a multimodal sensory experience. This means that it’s the interaction of our five senses, and all the external factors influencing them (called “multisensory interactions”), which underlie our perception of flavor (Auvray and Spence 2008). There is also research (and lots of anecdotal …

Roya Recovery Project Info

Hemileia vastatrix, or Coffee Leaf Rust (Roya in Spanish), is a leaf fungus that causes significant damage to coffee plants and therefore the supply and quality of crop for several harvest cycles after infestation. Today, it is creating a state of emergency in many parts of Central America. Most experts conclude that a warmer-than -normal …

An Introduction to Coffea Genetics

By Emma Sage, Coffee Science Manager, Specialty Coffee Association of America In an era where wild coffee is in actual imminent danger, the industry is increasingly interested in keeping up with the many scientific advances in coffee. In order to follow the current news, research, and events related to the genetics of Coffea arabica, it …

(Specialty) Coffee and Our Health

By Emma Sage, Coffee Science Manager, Specialty Coffee Association of America We have been hearing a lot of chatter lately in the popular media about the health effects of coffee. Generally, it is great to have some media coverage, especially when the stories are favorable towards coffee. But why do we drink specialty coffee? We …